blankonblank:

On this day in 1998, The Dude made his debut. Let’s all raise a White Russian to “The Big Lebowski.”

We abide!

oldblueeyes:

Timothy Leary: You aren’t like them. (x)

explore-blog:

The ever-delightful Zen Pencils adapt Calvin & Hobbes creator Bill Watterson’s timeless advice on integrity and the creative life in a comic. 
Itching to find your purpose and do what you love? Start with a brilliant resignation letter, then learn how to find fulfilling work.

We love this for so many reasons…

- Not everyone will have your vision
- You won’t always get help
- Hard work is key

But we mostly love it because, if a small red chicken can sow & reap corn, make flour & bake bread just imagine what you [an infinitely more intelligent & dextrous human being] can do!

"When all looked sour beyond words, some delightful ‘break’ was apt to lurk just around the corner.” Amelia Earhart.
—Just for a moment, think about the person these words describe. This is someone who took a few knocks. Someone who knew from her own experience that the going wasn’t always going to be smooth.
Words like these prove she had her doubts, lows and dark moments too. Perhaps this was her reason not to give up. We reckon it kind of explains why she accomplished so much.

"When all looked sour beyond words, some delightful ‘break’ was apt to lurk just around the corner.” Amelia Earhart.


Just for a moment, think about the person these words describe. This is someone who took a few knocks. Someone who knew from her own experience that the going wasn’t always going to be smooth.

Words like these prove she had her doubts, lows and dark moments too. Perhaps this was her reason not to give up. We reckon it kind of explains why she accomplished so much.

explore-blog:

Albert Einstein’s letter of advice to his 11-year-old son.

explore-blog:

Albert Einstein’s letter of advice to his 11-year-old son.

alliedschools:

“be of value.” Indeed.

alliedschools:

“be of value.” Indeed.

explore-blog:

A sneak peek inside Montreal-based artist James Paterson’s sketchbook at EyeO 2013.
Complement with a glimpse inside the Moleskine notebooks of celebrated creators and the sketchbooks of famous illustrators and designers. 

—I’m working in collaboration with a brilliant sketchnote artist at the moment so this post was a great reminder of the power and expressiveness of this medium.
I now see sketchnoting as a fascinating connective portal to aid communication and understanding, both of ourselves (i.e. our own thoughts, feelings, values, etc.) and between ourselves and others (i.e. what it can help us learn about relationships, emotions, motivations, compulsions & what makes us all tick).
It’s also just plain and simple great fun :D

explore-blog:

A sneak peek inside Montreal-based artist James Paterson’s sketchbook at EyeO 2013.

Complement with a glimpse inside the Moleskine notebooks of celebrated creators and the sketchbooks of famous illustrators and designers


I’m working in collaboration with a brilliant sketchnote artist at the moment so this post was a great reminder of the power and expressiveness of this medium.

I now see sketchnoting as a fascinating connective portal to aid communication and understanding, both of ourselves (i.e. our own thoughts, feelings, values, etc.) and between ourselves and others (i.e. what it can help us learn about relationships, emotions, motivations, compulsions & what makes us all tick).

It’s also just plain and simple great fun :D

George Orwell’s simple rules on effective writing:

(i) Never use a metaphor, simile, or other figure of speech which you are used to seeing in print.
(ii) Never use a long word where a short one will do.
(iii) If it is possible to cut a word out, always cut it out.
(iv) Never use the passive where you can use the active.
(v)Never use a foreign phrase, a scientific word, or a jargon word if you can think of an everyday English equivalent.
(vi) Break any of these rules sooner than say anything outright barbarous.

If you told me we’d quote James T. Kirk on this blog I’d have said you were dreaming, or at the very least you were an echo from an alternate reality. These words are here because the meaning is far more important than the source, plus let’s be honest, Kirk’s also a great literary character.
When Kirk shouts these words to Spock in the latest Star Trek movie he speaks as the arch pragmatist. A committed follower of the very powerful (and very human) instinct/impulse to ‘act’ and to ‘do’.
The desire to do something, anything instead of nothing can be a real force for good. It gives us a clear focus during uncertain times. It turns us from bystanders to participants. It teaches us (through experience) things we might otherwise not learn. It creates opportunities and outcomes that could not otherwise be possible. For the logicians among us it also produces new data, new parameters and new problems to solve.
Of course it isn’t all gravy. By forcing himself to act Kirk often makes mistakes, causes harm and creates enemies. But he chooses to act time and time again. As a result we all learn something (even Spock) and the story moves on.

If you told me we’d quote James T. Kirk on this blog I’d have said you were dreaming, or at the very least you were an echo from an alternate reality. These words are here because the meaning is far more important than the source, plus let’s be honest, Kirk’s also a great literary character.

When Kirk shouts these words to Spock in the latest Star Trek movie he speaks as the arch pragmatist. A committed follower of the very powerful (and very human) instinct/impulse to ‘act’ and to ‘do’.

The desire to do something, anything instead of nothing can be a real force for good. It gives us a clear focus during uncertain times. It turns us from bystanders to participants. It teaches us (through experience) things we might otherwise not learn. It creates opportunities and outcomes that could not otherwise be possible. For the logicians among us it also produces new data, new parameters and new problems to solve.

Of course it isn’t all gravy. By forcing himself to act Kirk often makes mistakes, causes harm and creates enemies. But he chooses to act time and time again. As a result we all learn something (even Spock) and the story moves on.